Forbidden Rice and Green Onion Hearth Bread

November 11, 2011

Last weekend I was fortunate enough to gather for a potluck with a fantastic group of fellow food lovers.  We are all part of Food52, a fabulous online community of inspired home cooks and knew each virtually through viewing, cooking, and commenting on each other’s recipes.  The gathering celebrated  the publication of the first Food52 cookbook, in which many of the party-goers had their own amazing recipes published.  The cookbook is beautiful and I can not wait to cook my way through it!

Not surprisingly, we all had a lot in common, most notably our love of good food.  The table was brimming with amazing dishes, most of them made from recipes found on Food52. It was difficult to decide what to bring, but I opted for fresh baked bread.

Forbidden Rice and Green Onion Hearth Bread is based on a recipe from Montana Culinary Students on Food52.  The contrast in texture and color that the black rice brings the bread drew me in.  Wild rice works as well, but Forbidden Rice sounds irresistibly tempting!  The onion adds a deep savory quality and works beautifully with the aromatic rosemary.  A hint of lemon zest adds a pleasant brightness to this hearty loaf. This bread will definitely become a regular in my baking rotation.  I imagine that it would make great croutons as well, if you are able to resist the bread while fresh.  This bread would also be a tremendous addition to the Thanksgiving table!

Check out what some of the fabulous cooks I met are doing on their own sites!  TasteFood, Still Simmering, The Year in Food, The Wimpy Vegetarian, The Beet Goes On, My Kitchen Solo.

Forbidden Rice and Green Onion Hearth Bread

makes 2 loaves

adapted from Montana Culinary Students on Food52

2 1/2 cups warm water

2 teaspoons yeast

1 cup whole wheat flour

2 teaspoons salt

5 1/4 cups all-purpose flour (plus a little more if needed)

2 teaspoons olive oil

1 bunch green onions, diced (about 3/4 cup)

1 cup cooked forbidden rice (or wild rice), drained and cooled

1 teaspoon minced fresh rosemary

zest of one lemon

Mix water and yeast, let sit for 5 minutes.  In a large bowl, mix the yeast mixture with the whole wheat flour and one cup of white flour.  Let this sit while you cook the green onions.

Heat a pan over medium heat.  Add the oil and green onions.  Cook, stirring periodically, until the onions soften.  Remove pan from heat and let cool.

Back to the bread, mix in the salt, cooled rice, rosemary, lemon zest, and cooled onions with any residual oil. Stir to combine.  Mix in the flour 1/2 cup at a time until the dough is supple, and only the least bit sticky.  Knead until dough is smooth and elastic.

First rise

Form dough into a ball and place in an oiled bowl.  Flip the dough ball so that the top of the dough is coated with oil as well.  Cover bowl and place in a warm place. (*At this point, you can put the dough in the refrigerator overnight.  This will allow the flavors to develop.  When you remove it from the refrigerator, allow a little extra time for the dough to come to room temperature and rise.)   Let dough rise until doubled, about 1 hour.

Second rise

Gently press down dough.  Cut dough into 2 equal parts.  Working with one piece at a time, press into a rectangular shape.  Take the two corners on one of the long sides and fold them towards the center.  Fold the middle point into the center as well.  Turn dough and repeat with the second side.  (see picture above) Press seam to seal.  Place the loaf seam side down on a parchment lined board.  Repeat with the second loaf.  Let loaves rise until they retain an indentation when you poke them- about an hour.

Bake

Preheat oven to 450 degrees with a baking stone on the bottom rack of the oven for 30 minutes.  On the bottom floor of the oven, put a baking sheet.   Once oven is hot, use a very sharp knife to make a few slits in the top of each loaf.  Immediately place loaves on the stone (or preheated baking sheet if you do not have a stone).  Add 2 cups of ice cubes to the baking sheet on the bottom of the oven (These will melt and add steam for good crust formation).  Bake for 35- 40 minutes, until top is nicely browned and bottom sounds hollow when you tap on it.  Place loaves on a baking rack and to cool.   Slice and serve.  Store any leftover bread in a tightly sealed bag on counter or in the freezer.

Print this recipe:  Forbidden Rice and Green Onion Hearth Bread

Find a link to this post and other delicious baked items at Yeastpotting.

More delicious bread at Tartine Bread Experiment

You may also like:

Oatmeal Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread

Sesame Pita Bread

Sunflower Millet Bread

About these ads

9 Responses to “Forbidden Rice and Green Onion Hearth Bread”

  1. TasteFood Says:

    I so enjoyed meeting you – and this bread was delicious!

  2. Hannah Says:

    This bread looks divine – I’m in a baking mood this weekend and will try it out. Sounds like you had a marvelous Food52 gathering!

  3. boulangere Says:

    Thanks for sharing such a lovely story. Love your take on the bread, love your blog!

  4. Ms. T Says:

    These photos are gorgeous, and the bread tasted even better! Such a wonderful texture. What a nice tribute to the Food52 community :)


  5. [...] Forbidden Rice and Green Onion Hearth Bread [...]

  6. Taylor Says:

    Half-Life Three is nearly here!. It will comke out att september 29 2014.Gabe
    Newell revealed that date.. Check official valve site :
    D. I hope it’s actually not a joke. Can’t wait
    to play it after all these months of hopeless games.
    :).


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 344 other followers

%d bloggers like this: